Overcrowded star restaurants despite inflation

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Overcrowded star restaurants despite inflation

Dutch star restaurants are doing good business with their reservations despite the high inflation and economic uncertainty. Guests want to dine at a high level and are prepared to pay the price for this. However, star businesses must also pass on the higher costs for purchasing and energy in their prices. This is evident from a tour of various restaurants that have been awarded Michelin stars.

Dutch star restaurants are doing good business with their reservations despite the high inflation and economic uncertainty. (ANP / Dolph Cantrijn)

Three-star restaurant De Librije in Zwolle says that reservations are ‘full until quite a long way into the future’. ‘In that respect, we certainly have no trouble attracting guests with our restaurant. A beautiful luxury position. In terms of spending, we notice that our guests have become more exuberant in their post-corona spending.

Aan de Poel in Amstelveen, with two stars, says that business is going very well. ‘To be honest, the reservations are going very well. We are very pleased with how things are going. There are also no problems with staff shortages. In that respect we are in a luxurious position.’

Parkheuvel in Rotterdam, which also has two stars, indicates that last year was already running well and that turnover will continue to rise this year. ‘So that’s very good. Once guests are inside, the sky is the limit. The people who come to us can afford it and want to enjoy it.’ Business is also going well at two-star restaurant De Kromme Watergang in Hoofdplaat in Zeeland. “The restaurant is running smoothly.”

But even star restaurants cannot escape the higher prices for food and energy. “We have certainly noticed some of the increased prices. We have tried to postpone it as long as possible, but we too have recently had to raise our prices slightly,” says De Librije.

Price increases

‘Of course we ask for higher prices, there is no other way. But people know what they come for, so that doesn’t affect us’, says Parkheuvel. The Kromme Watergang says it drives them crazy. “It’s not fun anymore. All costs are on average about 15 percent higher, not to mention electricity and gas. Unfortunately, we also have to raise prices as a result.’

Branch organization Koninklijke Horeca Nederland says that ‘despite the corona debts and energy crisis’ things are generally going well among the star businesses. ‘However, we cannot say exactly how star restaurants are doing financially at the moment. What we can say is that most catering entrepreneurs are currently feeling a healthy sense of urgency for the Michelin stars that will soon be awarded again.’


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