‘More frequent disagreement about placement in multi-person cells’

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‘More frequent disagreement about placement in multi-person cells’

The police have provided more details about the prisoner who was found dead on Wednesday in his multi-person cell in Krimpen aan den IJssel prison, and about his suspected cellmate. Lawyer Thomas van der Horst reports to Crimesite that there is more often ‘discord’ between detainees in these types of double cells. Especially since the decor has the last word in it.

by Joost van der Wegen

Research

The victim is a 24-year-old man of no fixed abode. The detainee who has been arrested is a 29-year-old man from The Hague. The police are currently investigating exactly what happened and what the 29-year-old man has to do with it.

The police do not report what happened in the cell and what led to the death of the man. The arrested man has been designated as a suspect in connection with the death of his cellmate.

Alarm

The police were alerted at 08:00 on Wednesday morning by the staff of the Krimpen aan den IJssel penitentiary. With the help of the internal assistance team, the man was taken outside and placed in an isolation cell, the Custodial Institutions Agency (DJI) reported.

It was not yet known yesterday whether the dead man died as a result of a crime.

Double cell

The incident took place in a so-called multi-person cell. Conditions are imposed on the persons who are locked up in a double cell. For example, they must not have a mental or behavioral disorder, be addicted, or be in poor health.

‘More frequent disagreement about placement in multi-person cells’

In response to this case, Crimesite called Thomas van der Horst, who often assists detainees in cases. He indicates that placement in a Multi-Person Cell (MPC) often results in ‘hassle’, because many prisoners think they are unsuitable for such a cell. ‘But the fact is that only if an institution gives a contraindication can someone be sure that no placement in an MPC will follow. And institutions are reluctant to do so.’

Power

Van der Horst states that the institution has a lot of power in this area, while the detainee hardly has sufficient legal protection against this. ‘As a result, there is regular disagreement between detainees, or between the institution and a detainee. For example about the day and night rhythm, hygiene, psychological problems, or even snoring. A discussion can arise with the institution about whether someone is suitable, or the refusal to exchange a detainee who is annoying or unsuitable for another.’

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