Adobe comes -how could it be otherwise- with its own answer to Dall-E

- Advertisement -spot_imgspot_img
Adobe comes -how could it be otherwise- with its own answer to Dall-E

Of course we know Adobe from Photoshop: the company knows exactly how to manipulate images. We are therefore not surprised that it comes with its own variant of Dall-E. It’s called Adobe Firefly and here too you can let artificial intelligence show its magic by entering text and create an illustration or photo that doesn’t exist yet.

Copyright and art

However, where Adobe makes a big difference – and, to be fair, it should make – is that it makes it very clear that it hasn’t stolen any artist’s work to train its Firefly. That doesn’t mean Firefly hasn’t had any training. So only content that is licensed and therefore paid for to use has been chosen.

It’s an important point to make, especially to the artist community. If there is a group of people who use a lot of Adobe products, then they are creative people. So yes, anyone who says Adobe is very late with its Firefly may have missed the discussions around creativity and copyright. To Adobe’s credit, it waited to see what would happen and then chose this path.

At the same time, it also has plans that are a bit more exciting: it also wants to give artists the opportunity to have the AI ​​trained with their own art. However, people are very afraid that this will cause many copycats and imitation, but Adobe would like to develop something to prevent this kind of malicious use.

Adobe Firefly

In that respect, the company is doing well, but is Firefly also working properly? We were not able to test it yet, but several American websites were already able to do so. The difference with Dall-E is that Adobe can handle text better. You can even ask Firefly to create some sort of WordArt. Very useful if you want to have a name logo made for your personal website or if you want to pimp up an invitation for a party with a thick letter.

In addition, Adobe Firefly is a bit more extensive than similar AI tools, because you can still release some Photoshop-like options once the image has been generated. Just lighten up a bit, for example, that can still be done immediately in Firefly.

Firefly is still a “browser trial,” but Adobe plans to add it to its Creative Cloud, which houses a variety of the brand’s creative products, such as Photoshop and Lightroom. In fact, the AI ​​will probably not be added as a separate program: it will be integrated into apps such as Photoshop. However, it is not that far yet, it is still in beta and you can already do that to report to give it a try.

Does it also mean that Adobe products will soon become more expensive? There is a good chance: Adobe will undoubtedly pass on the costs of developing this AI, but also keeping it up to date, to customers. However, exactly how that will work is still completely unknown, everything is really still in the test phase.

- Advertisement -spot_imgspot_img
Latest news
- Advertisement -spot_img
Related news
- Advertisement -spot_img